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Montana author’s latest book is set in the wilderness of northern British Columbia

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Author from Montana, Maggie Plummer’s latest book takes readers on a journey into the wilderness of northwestern British Columbia in the 1970s.

Author from Montana, Maggie Plummer’s latest book takes readers on a journey into the wilderness of northwestern British Columbia in the 1970s.

Plummer’s book Eagle in Flight, which is the third in a four-part series, is semi-autobiographical and borrows heavily from the author’s experience in British Columbia.

The novel begins in May 1975, as protagonist Jessie Morgan escapes into the remote wilderness of northern British Columbia. Traumatized by her ex-boyfriend’s violent attack, she takes to the sea and the rugged Stikine River, traveling solo in the off-grid North Country – where she hopes he can’t find her.

At the top of the Stikine, she visits her brother, a return to the lander who packs all her supplies up a four-mile-long trail to her hand-built cabin. From there, the protagonist travels to Sitka, Alaska, where she works in a fish processing plant and experiences adventures on commercial fishing boats.

Plummer, 70, began writing the book as a way to record her many stranger-than-fiction adventures.

Although the plot is fictional, Plummer says the journey and adventures are genuine and took place in his lifetime.

The description of life in the 70s is at the heart of the story.

“It was a very different time back then,” said Plummer, who lived in San Francisco in the early ’70s.

She traveled to Seattle from there and got on a jet boat and ended up spending time in Alaska as well as Telegraph Creek in northwest British Columbia.

Speaking of his time near Telegraph Creek, Plummer still remembers the Stikine River being almost like a way of life for the people who lived in the area at the time.

“I had never experienced real wilderness before,” said Plummer, who was 25 at the time.

It was a revelation for her.

“I think a person can idolize wilderness…but it’s not that easy to deal with,” Plummer said, adding that her real-life experiences were more intense than what she wrote in the book.

Plummer said her books aim to take readers to those places few have gone before, she said, adding: “How many fictional (or real, for that matter) characters have traveled up the Stikine River in the 1970s?”

Binny Paul, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, Terrace Standard